No Funnies Edition
  • Another winner from The Baffler. It hits so many sweet spots for me, such as quoting Jacques Ellul and criticizing advertising, propaganda, and this terrible upcoming US presidential election.
  • The ethical thing to do when you have a security vulnerability is to help the people responsible for the vulnerability to fix it. Often, it is instead hidden and weaponized, commoditized, and used against specific targets. However, during that period, non-targets with the same software can suffer the same attack until the owner of the software gets to fix it. Schneier talks about this in the Apple case.
  • Man lives in a box in a San Francisco apartment. Pretty cool box, actually, but the rent is still $400.
  • David Graeber posits an anthropological explanation of the tie.
  • Baffler has a great article on Advertorials/Sponsored Content/Native Advertising: "Newsfeeds and timelines become constant streams of media—a mutating mass of useless lists, videos, GIFs, viral schlock, service journalism, catchy charts, and other modular material that travels easily on social networks—all of it shorn of context."
  • You may wonder why IFTTT is disabling “support" for certain channels. Pinboard sheds some light on that.
  • A punk [sic] band is sending a Cease & Desist to a flea market for using a similar font. Their response is hilarious.
  • “Marooned Alien Princess" discusses how to face the competing pressures of the US presidential voting season.
  • Indianapolis is an innovative place with lots of startups and growth, but unfortunately many of our talented people are focused on being “marketing technology professionals" and playing on the wrong side of the adtech war
  • MIT Technology Review reminds us that “warrant proof" can mean lots of different things
  • Civil disobedience discussed at Apple: '“In the hierarchy of civil disobedience, a computer scientist asked to place users at risk has the strongest claim that professional obligations prevent compliance," said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center. “This is like asking a doctor to administer a lethal drug." There are ways an employee could resist other than quitting, such as work absences.'