I waited too long to publish this last batch, so the list is long. Hope you find some of these interesting! Recommend your own in the comments:

This is a hilarious and informative philosophical response about “puzzles for libertarians". (I’m probably one of the few people who reads both Current Affairs and Slate Star Codex.)

I’ve shared quite a bit about the Attention Economy. Richard Beck, here, brings that conversation out of the realm of advertising, software, etc. and into social interactions.

From Current Affairs, The Nice Cop, an article by someone who was friends with the killer of Philando Castile.
"It is ridiculous to think that you can arm your police with a military-grade arsenal, tell them that everyone they see is a potential threat, and not have bloodshed in the streets….It may be a necessary evil to have some units of armed police, but they should be few, small, and lightly-armed with pistols, shotguns, and rifles....In the event that unarmed police had to confront armed suspects, they would do what cops already do: call for backup."

You’ve heard about the various folks repenting for what they’ve done to attention with tech. Some of them are banding together at Humane Tech to make things better. Here is their first resource page. Lots of good advice on there.

"We're ultimately after justice, not fairness. And by stopping with fairness, we are shortchanging the people most at risk." from The Problem with Building a “Fair" System

"It’s not beneficial to us to turn content recommendations over to an algorithm, especially one that’s been optimized for garbage." From Facebook is Killing Comedy
Related: YouTube: the Great Radicalizer: "It seems as if you are never 'hard core' enough for YouTube’s recommendation algorithm. It promotes, recommends and disseminates videos in a manner that appears to constantly up the stakes."

“Get out of jail free" cards. Remember, even “benevolent" discrimination in execution of the law leads to further inequalities.

"Creating a social stigma around people who refused to cede the street to cars was a means for car companies to redirect blame back onto victims and strengthen motorists’ claim to the right-of-way." On the Creeping Criminalization of Walking

'When you create a Human+AI team, the hard part isn’t the “AI". It isn’t even the “Human". It’s the “+".’ Humans are good at asking questions. AI are good at answering them. This “centaur" pairing is effective.

We all know hiring for security expertise is difficult. Here’s a heatmap including supply/demand ratios by state.

Cool infographic about the naming of tea in different languages.
Another cool infographic about happiness.

This idea of “Near Enemies" is a very useful concept.

"Smaller crowds outperform larger crowds and individuals in realistic task conditions." Anybody have a copy of this article?